VERMONT GUN LAWS

vermont state seal

QUICK FACTS

Carry In VehicleYES
Must Notify Officer NO
Carry In State Parks AllowedYES
No Weapons Signs Enforced YES
Open Carry Permitted YES
Carry In Liquor Establishments YES
Constitutional Carry YES

Permit Information


Vermont gun laws are the most permissive in the United States. The state does not issue permits for carrying firearms and operates on an "Unrestricted" policy. Any person 16 or older (Federal law requires the age to be 18) and who can legally possess a firearm is allowed to carry openly or concealed. There is no distinction between resident or non-resident, both are allowed to carry without a permit in Vermont.

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CCW Reciprocity Map

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Driver license recognition

  • Drivers License honored
  • Driver License not honored
  • Issuing state


Vermont allows any person who is legally allowed a firearm to carry in the state without a permit.

New Laws

Three new laws where signed in April 2018. They are as follows;

Magazine restrictions - Bans the sale or possession of magazines holding more that 15 rounds for a handgun or 10 rounds for a longun.

Must be 21  - all gun sales must be completed through a licensed firearms dealer unless the transfer is to  a family member.  Buyers must be at least 21 years old, however, this does not apply if the person has completed a Vermont hunters course or is in the the military or law enforcement.

Confiscation - allows the police to confiscate a firearm if the person poses a threat.

Permitless Carry


Alaska, Arizona, Kansas, Maine, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, Vermont and West Virginia have “Permitless Carry.” If you can legally possess a firearm then you may carry it concealed in those states without a Permit/License.

Off Limit Areas

Where You Can Carry

  • State parks
  • State and national forests
  • Road side rest areas
  • Vehicle
  • All areas of the state - except those listed below

Where You Cannot Carry

  • School building or school property
  • School bus
  • Courthouse
  • Any state institution
  • A building with controlled points of public access, metal screening devices at each point of public access, and locked compartments, accessible only to security personnel, for storage of checked firearms
  • Any place where the carrying of firearms is prohibited by Federal Law.

Details on Vermont Gun Laws

Comments

  1. I’m 19 years old and looking at owning my first pistol. It will be gifted to me but can I carry it on my person?

    1. In the state of Vermont as far as the law states you need to be 16 years of age. That is the only requirment. You do not need a license, to have the gun registered, and you can open or concealed carry

      1. Do I have to be 21 to purchase a rifle here if I have an orange card? I completed the hunter safety course and I’m looking to buy a rifle for hunting from a dealer when I turn 18. Can someone pls help?

  2. I plan on buying in Vermont relatively soon and live there seasonally, but am not going to be using the home as a primary residence in the immediate future. Will I be able to purchase a pistol with a primary residence in another state?

    Thanks for resources!

    1. I live in Vermont. As long as you are legally allowed to own a weapon in Vermont, Vermont does not care where you are from. So as long as one of these does not apply to you then feel free to come here and buy stuff:
      Have been convicted of a crime punishable by imprisonment for over a year;
      Are a fugitive from justice;
      Illegally abuse controlled substances;
      Have been adjudicated as mentally defective of incompetent, or have been committed to a mental institution;
      Are an illegal alien;
      Are a former US citizen who has renounced his citizenship;
      Were dishonorably discharged from the US Armed Forces;
      Are subject to a restraining order; or
      Were convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence.
      Signed- an ultra liberal 2nd amendment proponent…

  3. I recently moved to Vermont, am a lifelong gun owner from out of state. I went shopping for safes today and an older woman was helping me out. I asked, out of curiosity, if purchase of firearms in VT was subject to the same required 6 month residency period as buying a resident hunting liscence was, she said absolutely yes. Im combing the internet and cant find a single place that’s says I have to wait 6 months after getting drivers liscence before I can buy. Is she misinformed here?

    1. She is not giving you correct info. As long as you do not fall into one of these categories then you can buy a gun even if you are from North Korea.

      Have been convicted of a violent crime;
      Have been convicted of a crime punishable by imprisonment for over a year;
      Are a fugitive from justice;
      Illegally abuse controlled substances;
      Have been adjudicated as mentally defective of incompetent, or have been committed to a mental institution;
      Are an illegal alien;
      Are a former US citizen who has renounced his citizenship;
      Were dishonorably discharged from the US Armed Forces;
      Are subject to a restraining order; or
      Were convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence

      Your welcome, Signed- an ultra liberal 2nd amendment proponent…

    2. Yes, to the best of my knowledge, you were misinformed. I switched from a CT license to a VT license, and was able to make a purchase on the same day.

  4. Can I have my 9mm pistol locked in my trunk on state correctional facility property??

  5. Hi,

    I welcome anyone’s input, etc. I’m looking to retire from NYC to Vermont within the next few years. I legally own firearms here, which have some of the strictest laws in the nation.

    Does anyone know what I need to do, if anything at all? I’m so used to such strict laws here that simply moving up there and not telling anyone I have firearms seems extremely odd. Will I also be able to legally carry my firearms as well?

    Also, is a person allowed to target shoot on their own property? My friend lives in upstate NY and as long as we are on his property, we are allowed to shoot but with basic common sense and responsibly of course.

    Obviously, I have a lot of questions and even though I currently have family that resides in Vermont, they don’t own firearms and won’t discuss the topic.

    Thank you in advance for any assistance you can provide me with. I appreciate it.

    1. You don’t need to do much at all, you can carry open or concealed no need for permits or notifying Vermont police officers. Shooting on your property is perfectly fine as long as your outside of city limits and you don’t have neighbors that live close. I live in Vermont and I’ve been shooting all my life, carry where you want (obviously not schools or courthouses) and when you want. If you have any more questions I’d be more than willing to answer.

  6. Do you have the right to have a concealed firearms on Canusa street in Stanstead (road 247 in Quebec) if you stay on the side of the United States.

  7. A coworker of mine carries a sidearm in the glove compartment with a loaded magazine and chamber. It’s my understandings night that the chambered round is illegal. Please enlighten me. Thank you.

    1. They are allowed to have a round in the chamber and a magazine loaded.

    2. In the state of Vermont, you can carry handguns in any condition, in your vehicle or in you concealed or open. No restrictions. Not obligated to disclose to officer either. However, as merely good manners and etiquette do disclose.
      When it comes to long guns, it’s unlawful to carry a loaded long gun. Ammo should not be touching the rifle, can carry ammo and rifle in the cabin as long as there is no contact between them.

  8. Can I carry a handgun concealed at 16. It wasn’t quite clear do I have to be 18?

    1. Youre good my guy.. im 20 and a resident of springfield.. i asked the police sargent personally and his response was “if you are legally allowed to own a firearm and the firearm is registered to you, you can carry, just please conceal carry so we dont get calls for you walking down the street with a gun on your hip”

      Here parents/guardians/spouses over 21 can gift/transfer any firearm to someone under 18

    1. If they were unknowingly sell them the gun then no they are not liable.

    2. It’s a grey area as they could still end up being arrested and dealing with the courts to prove that they it was an “accident”

  9. I had a restraining order in Massachusetts over 7 years ago that was expired then I live in Vermont. Can I now go and apply for a firearm listener and can I have a gun now?

  10. I go to college in Vermont and am a citizen of the state but live in Massachusetts when I’m not in school. What are the laws about if I was going to purchase a handgun at 18 and bring it back to Mass? What about an AR-15 which is legal in Vermont but not in Mass? I have an FID in Mass.

    1. You can’t carry it in mass but you can possess it must be secured out of reach

    2. You can buy an AR-15 as long as its complete and not just a lower but you can not bring it back to Mass

    3. I’m in a similar situation as yours. My rule is what I shoot and carry in VT, stays in VT.

  11. I live in maine and travel to vermont for work during the weeks. Wondering if there’s any law against me carrying either open or concealed or do I need a permit from maine.

    1. Any legal US resident is allowed to carry, open or concealed, without a permit in Vermont.

    2. If you are a citizen, you can carry in VT concealed or open. In VT there is only one permit for carrying guns… the Constitution.

  12. I’m thinking of moving up you way and New Hampshire and Vermont seem to be the most reasonable states for gun laws in the area. Do you have to register each gun with the state, rifle or pistol. I see where I will have to dispose of my 20 and 30 rd. mags. before I get there, I guess.

    1. If the magazine was purchased before October 1st 2018 you may own and keep your magazine if any size

  13. If I am from out of state, what type of documentation do I need to sell a handgun to a vermont dealer?

  14. If I am of age in NH to buy a gun and old enough in VT to posses one does that mean I may purchase one in NH and bring it home?

    1. Under federal law a non-resident may not purchase and take delivery of a handgun. It needs to be transferred to an FFL in the state of residence. Also, under federal law, in order for a non-resident to purchase and take delivery of a rifle or shotgun, the sale must be in compliance with the laws of both the state of residence and the state in which the purchase occurs. Short answer is NO.

  15. Except for the magazine limits, which make a bunch of guns illegal to own now, this state is very pro-gun.

    1. There are no restriction on guns and magazine before Oct 2018 are grandfathered. There is also no registration for them, so the state does not know what you have.

  16. Can a person who was admitted to a mental hospital but medically cleared purschase a firearm in Vermont?

    1. Court ordered admission who is cleared by doctors to not be mentally unstable or have no lifelong mental disorder can in most cases. I would check with your local FBI office as they are who determines eligibility based on the NICS. If you unknowingly are not allowed to carry/own a firearm, and do, you are still committing a felony. Ignorance of the law in the case of firearms does not provide a defense.

  17. If you live out of state can you purchase a pistol using a driver’s license and passport? If so, I’d there a waiting period?

    1. No. Under federal law a non-resident may not purchase and take delivery of a handgun. It needs to be transferred to an FFL in the state of residence and transferred in accordance with the laws of the state of residence.

      1. Vermont recognizes college students and any other person that resides in the state for at least 6 months of the year as a resident. If this is your situation, you are fine, but many dealers may require a lease, bill, or tuition statement as proof of residence. Being registered to vote or having an ID in another state does not disqualify you in Vermont. This is a very specific scenario, but common.

        1. I plan on buying in Vermont relatively soon and live there seasonally, but am not going to be using the home as a primary residence in the immediate future. Will I be able to purchase a pistol with a primary residence in another state?

    2. The law vs. what you can actually get away with are 2 different things. My guess is that a lot of people asking about the intestate laws here, are trying to circumvent the laws regarding what can be sold in their home state. Since most states do not require registration of rifles (excluding NY: for weapons classified as “assault rifles” under the SAFE act {although registration is rarely checked, except when a crime occurs, as the NYSP refuse to enforce certain aspects of the legislation}, CT: I think all firearms must be registered, and NJ- for states in the area) being able to purchase a firearm in VT is an easy way to get a gun that is legally “grandfathered” to own in another state, as there would be no way of knowing when or where the firearm was acquired.

      It used to be that a person could drive up to Vermont and buy any gun off an online classified. The law did not require the seller to keep any record, nor confirm the eligibility or legality of the person buying the gun- unless the person knew that the buyer was restricted from owning a firearm. Some sellers would refuse to sell to out-of-staters, but only because if the person brought the firearm across state lines to a state where it was illegal, the seller could be charged as an acomplice for a federal violation of interstate gun trafficking.

      The new (2018) laws requiring an FFL to conduct the transfer made that much more difficult. Although, the law is merky when it comes to if an FFL is actually required to conduct the transfer, or if a local police agency can perform a background check on the buyer (at least that is my interpretation). Theoretically, a background check has nothing to do with residency, it simply tells if someone is allowed to own a firearm. So theoretically, a person could have a background check performed (I believe within 3 days of the transfer) by a police agency, and present the documentation of a satisfactory check, and then buy a firearm directly from a third party. Although even if a police agency conducts the background check, an FFL may still be required to conduct the transfer.

      Pawn Shops in VT are often loaded with firearms, they fall under an exception in the FFL code. They must keep records of buyer and seller, as well as gun info, for 6 years, but that seems to be all that they need to do. Since they are not FFLs, they don’t have the same risks associated with conducting a potentially risky sale (i.e. losing their license and going out of business, like could happen to an FFL). In fact, the statute explicitly states that a failure to comply with applicable regulation regarding record keeping is subject to a maximum penalty of $100 per offense. Pawn shops are also often seedy businesses that have a desire to do business, so they are most likely to look the other way.

      Also, VT does not regularly conduct sting operations on gun sales, so there are still people who would gladly do a direct transfer if it meant getting their asking price.

      Obviously what is legal, what is accepted, and what is possible are 3 completely different things. But as a general rule, an FFL is likely to set their own rules when it comes to selling to someone from out of state. Again, let’s say someone buys a pistol in Vermont, drives it over the border into NY, and then tries to sell it illegally, if the gun is traced back to the FFL who sold it, they will likely receive at least a strike on their license, a temporary suspension or even a revocation of their license. It’s most often not worth it for them to do out of state business, even if the sale might be legal, simply because once a gun crosses state lines, then it becomes a federal issue. A couple FFLs told me I had to own land in Vermont and have a property tax statement if I did not have a VT driver’s license/ID (or had a VT ID with a P.O. box listed instead of an actual address). This was over the phone, I’m sure if I had showed up to those stores with my utility bills and bank statements for my VT property, and they had seen I was not a delinquent looking person, they would have accepted that as proof of part-time residency. The law is clear enough that a part-time resident is allowed to buy weapons in the state with only the VT state laws applying. However, a large number of illegal weapons (especially pistols) in NY were coming out of VT- it was NY lobbies and lawmakers that put pressure on Vermont to establish the FFL transfer requirement and ban large cap mags that were being purchased in bulk and sold in NY. The two States share a border, as well as several watersheds, so there was a feeling of the need to establish some sort of reciprocity to prevent interstate relations from souring.

      So to reiterate… Are you allowed to vs. Are you able to, are the key differentiators here. And there are many ways to still circumvent the laws. If you look like an upstanding citizen and (I don’t mean to profile, but a lot of people will) if you are white, you have a much better shot of being able to exploit/use loopholes & undefined sections of the law in your favor when purchasing. If someone suspects that you plan on illegally transporting the firearm across state lines, or look like you might be the type of person to resell the firearm to someone restricted from owning it, then you will have more trouble.

      One thing I do want clarification on is whether an echo trigger (made by BFS for AK and AR platforms; round fired on trigget pull and a second round fired on release), is legal in VT. The law clearly defines a bump stock as being illegal, but they very concisely define what a bump stock is, and it in no way relates to the action of an Echo trigger (which is federally legal). Still, most places that sell them won’t ship one to Vermont. I feel like that’s because they just see “bump stocks are banned in VT” and assume that they use a loose definition like in other states that ban them (as in “any trigger modification that allows modified cycling of the action to allow for an increased rate of fire”, etc.), whereas Vermont specifically banned bumpfire stocks by explicit definition.

  18. Even being Bernie Sanders State Vermont has had and still has the best firearms laws in the country

      1. thats only because the loser that got elected governor lied to us and told us he would not change a thing, then turn his back when he got elected and banned high capacity mags and other dumb shit

          1. The current governor – Phil Scott (R)

          2. Phil Scott, a demonrat in disguise. Oh, sorry, I meant democrat… or did I?

    1. Mr. Bernard Sanders is from New York. The gun tradition in the state of Vermont goes back to the Revolutionary War with Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys. Unfortunately, our beautiful state is now linked to this despicable sad joke left over from the 60s communist-loving who has never achieved anything in his entire life other than milking the system and preying on the gullible.

        1. Obviously you have not done anything since high school chuck because if you had you would not have brought it up. remember people who live in glass house should not throw rocks. And before you ask I am a decorated Vietnam Veteran with 4 college degrees .

          1. That seems like an excessive number of degrees. Like, are some of them at least consecutive (e.g. bachelor’s, masters, PhD…) or are they all in different areas of study? No disrespect meant, but you could mean 4 associates degrees from community colleges (although I do doubt that’s what you were implying).

            Did you obtain those degrees out of intellectual curiosity, out of desire to change career paths, or in the pursuit of greater heights in a single field? Just curious.

            Still a respectable achievement, no matter the reason.

            Much respect on your Vietnam service and accolades… I can’t imagine what that war must have been like, and regardless of the political motivations behind that conflict’s justification, it has no bearing on why you personally chose to serve. You served your country, served your fellow soldier… risked life and limb for a cause greater than yourself: that shows both valiency and willinngness to sacrifice. Whether or not people find the war to have been just, given tremendous hindsight that was not available at the time, is irrelevant to your service.

  19. Howdy,
    Am I missing something here but how does Vermont honor 53 other states permits? Is this the last president’s states counting system?

    Thanks!

    1. Author

      50 states plus districts and territories, did not have enough room to put all the text into our counters.

    2. DC
      Puerto Rico
      Guam
      Virgin Islands
      Not states, but recognized.
      A little joke… in the list of states by GDP, the state of VT scores 51st. DC scores higher.

    3. Can I get a pistol if I move to Vermont.Even though I have 3 ouis going back 40 years 1st one in my didn,t go to court came back at me 13 years later when I didn’t drink had to spend two weeks at a place in my.second one someone set me up police waiting 3 blocks from bar in my parking lot.last one on me

  20. So the thing I’m wondering is what you need to bring with you to buy a handgun, I have yet to do so and I would love to know what I need, if anything at all to buy one. I’ve been gifted guns my whole life, therefore have still yet to exercise that part of my 2nd amendment right yet.

      1. You sound like a child yourself and no they’re not children that teenagers I was getting laid at the age

      2. I was shooting trap competitively at age 12 and by 15 competing in youth pistol competitions.

        1. I can’t speak definitively for Vermont, but in Ohio, a 16/17 year old was not allowed to transport his or her trap gun to practices or tournaments. Someone above 18 (and legally allowed to do so) had to be present during transportation. In Vermont, as a 16 year old has a provision to possess a firearm, I would extrapolate that the 12-15 year old trap shooter would be required to be accompanied by someone over 16. At practices, even if the 12 year old’s parent didn’t stay, he or she was under the supervision of the coach. If the 12 year old was to shoot the 14 year old bully on the next firing point, the coach(es) would be called to answer a lot of questions. (Why didn’t you keep the 14 year old from being an a$$h01e? Why would you let a kid with poor impulse control out on your firing line?)

          It strikes me that Vermont tends to respect personal responsibility. They also don’t bother to get wrapped around the axle about what Could happen, and what penalties should be exacted for those things, when numerous things had to go wrong first. In other words, What Ifs can only go to a certain point.

    1. i feel that it is important that if someone that young is responsible enough should be taught how to handle a firearm and be taught how to shoot it and respect it. the world would be a safer place.

    1. My mans Bob knows wassup we gonna rock the Jon deer out of you. That is if we can see you in your duck huntin’ suits. We wouldn’t want to come by to fight and walk in on you and your cousins anyway.

    2. you beat us out in the realm of “Uninformed citizen” for sure. well done trolls

  21. Justin, how was the day on the ranch? Did you take your John Deer for a spin? How many bucks did you get?

  22. It’s nice to live in and around the few remaining states that still honor the Constitution & Bill Of Rights. Where the majority of citizens have enough common sense to realize that the bad actions of some should not affect all. Here’s an idea, address the mental health crisis that plagues every state in the country, observe isolate and address/treat citizens with mental health or potential mental health or violent tendencies. “If you see something, say something” clearly does not work all the time. But the purpose is too identify these individuals at the first sign of potential problems. Mentally challenged/Violent individuals should not under any circumstances be able to get any firearm. Personally I do not have a degree in Psychology or Sociology, but I feel very confident in saying someone who is able to carry out an attack/mass shooting is not mentally healthy. In most cases there were signs that were either ignored or not properly investigated. So, should every citizen be punished by making stricter gun laws because of these mentally ill individuals ? Flip it, let’s start putting heavy restrictions on the 1st Amendment… any citizen that does not favor one particular side of government views should be punished. That sounds pretty ridiculous right? Words can be as dangerous as guns, words can certainly cause someone to snap right? Hers my point, common sense is lacking in every new generation that comes along.

    1. The first amendment was made when there weren’t aussault rifles. You don’t need to light up those deer you huntin’ with an automatic weapon. You should be thankful that mentally challenged people can get a gun or else you would be trying to hunt a buck with your bare hands. As of now as long as you pass the backgroud check you can go shoot deer all day long buddy.

      1. The first amendment also had nothing to do with computers so if you got something to say write a letter and have a guy on a horse drop it off

      2. Plus automatic weapons have been illegal for some time now so why don’t you try learning some facts

        1. You’re misinformed, machine guns are legal if you have the money and possess the tax stamp.

      3. SE2 isn’t about hunting. please experiment with reading on the topic before posting on the topic Henry.

      4. How irresponsibly ignorant do you have to be if you didn’t think that the founding fathers weren’t smart enough to understand that there would be an advancement in technology long after they were gone. They were alive long enough to see many weaponry and technological advancements through their own lifetime. How dumb are you?

      5. And also it’s the second amendment you f****** d****** not the First Amendment. The first amendment allows me to call you stupid as much as I want to because you are f****** stupid.

        1. James, you’re last reply said it all. He must have voted for Hillary. I would now like to execute my 1st amendment right to call call Henry Allen the 3rd a f@ckin idi@t.

      6. First Henry Allen the 3rd your a fuckin idiot!!! It’s the second amendment!!! Not the first. And when someone is trying to kill you and your family some psycho and the cops are nowhere around , you’ll be wishing and praying that someone with Balls has a gun to save your punk ass!!
        Remember that. This is a crazy world full of crazy people and the second amendment gives the good guys an even playing field.

      7. Semi automatic rifle dumb ass. Hey genius if it’s not mental health issues and the way these kids are raised these days then why didn’t we have these issues 15-20 years ago. I am so sick of hearing these kids complaining that they can’t cope. Suck. It up and stop crying. Doctors are handing out psychotic drugs like M&M’s.

      8. *I think you mean 2nd ammendment.

        And it is about equal firepower. The role of the 3 branches of government is to keep each other in check, the role of the states is to keep the federal government in check, when all that fails it is the role of the citizenry- the fourth estate (branch of government) to take action. When the government no longer acts in the best interests and desires of its subjects, the citizens need to be able to react. An argument is often made that since the military has MQ predator drones and ICBMs (which obviously would be impossible for a citizen to posess) the 2nd amendment is moot. But history will show that when a government becomes corrupt, the military splinters. Soldiers do not want to harm their fellow citizen, most will disobey orders that are contrary to their morals, and furthermore, the military does not have implied immunity like the Police. The military functions largely independent of the central powers. While they may require authorization from the President or Congress, and while they may be used as a tool of the ruling power, they answer to a chain of command that is largely independent of the 3 branches. That chain dictates HOW the service qccomplishes its goals, WHAT it does- the President may authorize military action as “The Commander in Chief” or Congress might, they may dictate who the enemy is, but it is up to the Generals to draft plans for accomplishing those orders and relaying the commands. Those generals would not deploy ballistic warheads on American soil, no matter who told them to, and would likely mutiny.

        It is the Police that are the tool of suppression for the ruling parties. They are given implied immunity, which gives them a sense of being on a higher level than the average citizen. As of late, they have been given extremely high salaries, particularly in upscale areas where they face little danger, and they are deployed to silence any protest that grows large enough to draw attention.

        The Police are used to keep the citizenry in check, and if it was to come to a point where the central government passed a bridge too far, we should be prepared to stand up for our rights.

        The government should fear the citizens more than the citizens fear the government- that is obviously no longer the case, or unfavorable bills would not pass bipartisanly through the senate on a regular basis, benefiting only the elite and hurting the majority. The DHS would think twice before sending commandos to break up protesters, and if a bill was passed that the people did not support, the people would walk freely to the steps of the White House and demand change.

        Putting firearms into the hands of those who would legally possess them would also make for a safer situation. Look at the most recent mass shootings and you will discover that most of them were carried out with weapons procured by another individual or through illegal means. There are far too many untracked firearms in the world to keep them out of the hands of the people that would aquire them illegally. Look at the percentage of legally acquired firearms used in gang related violence- almost zero. Look at the statistics for murders committed with legally acquired guns- very low. But look at the mass shooting in California, where an inexperienced minor, not legally allowed to purchase or own a firearm (acquired by a friend), was able to fiddle with emptying and reloading 3 clips, while all anyone could do was cower or run, because a pistol permit is almost impossible to get nowadays in most of costal California. The shooter was able to take his time picking targets, and flee before anyone with the ability to counter arrived on scene. The authorities cannot be everywhere.

        Meanwhile, in Texas, there have been 3 would-be mass shootings averted by legally carrying individuals. People did not die, so those stories were just a blip on national news. In those cases, one involved a shooter surrendering before firing a shot because someone pulled a legally concealed weapon on them, in another case the would be shooter was wounded and restrained by a good samaritan, and in a third the shooter was mortally wounded. Those were potential incidents where dozens could have been killed, but the legally carrying citizens were able to stop the acts. If you count the incidences of personal defense that occurs on an almost weekly basis, not necessarily involving fatalities, as a gun can be a powerful motivator for someone to surrender, without the need to fire a shot, the numbers are staggering.

        There will always be more good doers than evil doers, and there will always be evil doers . Without the capacity of the good to react, those evil doers will succeed.

    2. At one time mental health workers could request a police officer to attend a visit to mental health person. is this still on the books???? Retired P>O>

  23. This is horrible, we need gun laws stop these rednecks from killing everybody!

    1. Vermont is the safest state for violent crime, go blame someone else. Go read something on the topic prior to posting.

    2. You’re an idiot. The real concern here is how are they going to accept 53 State’s carrying licenses if we only have 50 states. technically they should only be able to accept 49 other state carrying licenses.

      1. You have DC plus Guam, US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico who are US territories so that makes it 53. I don’t like the fact that only 9 states honor the Vermont permit.

    3. You NEED some LEAD in your diet you pansy assed douchebag and leave the discussions to the adults and beat it

    4. Rednecks are killing everybody huh? You realize African Americans commit 53% of all gun crime yet account for 13% of the population. And most of the firearms are illegally possessed. And most of the crimes are committed in democrat controlled cities. The safest parts of the country are rural America where everyone is heavily armed. Now go drink soy milk and burn down a Burger King. Or whatever you white liberals riddled with guilt do in your spare time.

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